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So who is this guy?
In 1996, I discovered Monte Warden completely by accident, when I popped open the Gateway 2000 CD-rom that came with my first computer, and played one of its few "sample videos." I was treated to a lively rendition of "Give My Heart A Break" by some Elvis/Buddy Holly look-alike that I had never seen before. Well, I'm no dummy. I loved the song and I bought the cd. Both of 'em. And in February 1999, the third, 'A Stranger to Me Now' will arrive.

Look out.

Monte Warden is at the forefront of the Austin country/pop culture as a songwriter, singer and performer. Here're a few Monte Warden bios and commentaries that I snatched off of various online sources:


From MusicHound Country: The Essential Album Guide:
Monte Warden was born on April 26, 1967, in Houston, TX.
A fixture on the fertile Austin, Texas, music scene since he was a teenager, Monte Warden combines the giddy innocence of vintage Buddy Holly with the hard-nosed spirit of classic Lone Star honky-tonk. The result is an inspiring, irresistible sound reminiscent of an era when rock 'n' roll was more about joy than rebellion. Since breaking up The Wagoneers, a rootsy quartet that released two excellent, but out-of-print, late-1980s albums for A&M ('Stout and High' and 'Good Fortune'), Warden has developed into one of Austin's most revered writers and his upbeat, hook-laden songs have been covered by Kelly Willis and Patty Loveless. Now signed to River North, he continues to expand upon his remarkable melodic strengths with help from such co-writers as Bill Lloyd and Colin Boyd. A harder-rocking edge marks many of his newer compositions, including a brooding gospel-country ballad called "Child, I'm Not Finished with You Yet" that would have sounded right at home on Gillian Welch's debut.
From the Encyclopedia of Popular Music, Copyright Muze UK Ltd. 1989 - 1998:
Guitarist Brent Wilson and drummer Tom Lewis had both toured with the vintage rock 'n' roller Sleepy LaBeef. In the late 80s they teamed up with singer-songwriter Monte Warden and bass player Craig Pettigrew to form the neo-rockabilly band, The Wagoneers. 'Stout And High' included a guest appearance from Herb Alpert (owner of A&M who released the album) and they had moderately successful singles with 'I Want To Know Her Again' and 'Every Step Of The Way'. The Wagoneers never fulfilled their potential and a third album was shelved, largely because of disagreements between Lewis and Warden. Since then, Warden has formed Monte Warden And The Lone Sharks, working with the drummer and producer Mas Palermo.
From the All-Music Guide:
Monte Warden combines a rockabilly roots-rock with honky tonk and blue-eyed-soul ballads. He first caught the eyes of his native Austin, TX's scene in 1983. At the age of 15, Warden's trio Whoa Trigger! won Best New Band at a local awards show. Five years later, his band, The Wagoneers, won the award again and became a "young country" favorite with two albums on A&M, 'Stout and High' and 'Good Fortune.' His first solo album (self-titled) appeared in July of 1993, and the follow-up, 'Here I Am' was released in July 1995. 'Another Try' followed in 1998. His solo backing band, The Lonesharks, includes guitarist Brent Wilson (formerly of The Wagoneers), bassist Brad Fordham, and drummer/co-producer Mas Palermo. -- John Bush
Profile of The Wagoneers, from the All-Music Guide:
The Wagoneers came out of Austin, Texas during the 1980's with a sound that quickly attracted a following among traditionalists as well as the rockabilly crowd. Made up of Austin favorite Monte Warden on lead vocals and rhythm guitar, Brent Wilson playing lead and contributing backing vocals, Craig Allan Pettigrew on bass and drummer Thomas A. Lewis, Jr., the Wagoneers opened the floodgates for what was to be known as alternative country. Throwing a fist in the face of Nashville's manufactured hat act syndrome, The Wagoneers created a very loud buzz. With a first successful release on Herb Alpert's A&M Records, 'Stout and High,' they filled a void that had been overlooked. After making a big splash, The Wagoneers followed up with a second CD that quickly vanished from memory. However, their contribution to the never ending search for real country music places them in the history books along side other bands like the Lonesome Strangers, the Georgia Satellites, the Derailers and another Texas act, High Noon. The band eventually disintegrated and Warden went on to a solo career that depended more on pop music rather than the traditional C&W that fit his vocal style so well. -- Jana Pendragon


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